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Engage Naturally — Our Earth Day Initiative

Engage Naturally Simply Wood Rings

In honor of Earth Day, from April 1st to the 22nd (that's Earth Day, folks), we are donating 10% of the price of your order to an environmental charity of your choice.* If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions let us know on our Facebook, Instagram, or via email

*For now, we're focusing on the following four organizations: 

Environmental Defense Fund

EDF Logo Background

The Environmental Defense Fund, or EDF, works on policy reform and corporate responsibility to do the following : provide clean air by driving down our collective exposure to pollutants and toxic chemicals; increase agricultural resiliency by creating economic demand for sustainable and climate-adaptive farming, ranching, and water efficiency programs; expanding sustainable fishing worldwide; and, finding solutions that will have the biggest impact on the clean energy market in the United States.

You can read more about the EDF on their website at : https://www.edf.org/what-we-do?_ga=1.49692068.362234321.1490024081

The Sierra Club Foundation

Sierra Club Rocky

The Sierra Club Foundation attempts to find climate solutions and continues the legacy of conservation in the United States. The Sierra Club defends against coal and clears the way for clean, renewable energy solutions (solar and wind). They also protect America’s wild places and the beauty, escape, clean water, wildlife habitat, and recreational opportunities they provide by keeping fossil fuels in the ground and attempting to secure permanent protection for national treasures. The Sierra Club also offers a Military Outdoors program that successfully works to bring over 50,000 service members, veterans, and their families outside. This program increases physical activity, outdoor recreation, and education that improves academic performance, reduces stress and anxiety, and mitigates the effects of PTSD and traumatic brain injury in the military veterans returning from active service. The Sierra Club currently funds The Great Outdoors Lab — a groundbreaking research study documenting the biological and emotional effects of spending time outdoors.

Read about the Sierra Club’s initiatives here : http://www.sierraclubfoundation.org/what-we-fund/mission-outdoors

Earthjustice

Earthjustice logo

You may have heard this Charity Navigator 4-star-rated Earthjustice PSAs on the radio or while listening to a podcast. Their slogan is “Because the Earth needs a good lawyer.” Earthjustice works on a variety of projects, some of these include: protecting endangered species such as wolves; preserving rich, sustainable and diverse heritage of the arctic regions, the ocean ecosystem, America’s wild lands, and wildlife; promoting healthy communities by fighting for clean air, water, and agricultural practices; championing clean energy systems, mitigating the effects of climate change, and reducing reliance on coal and oil and gas drilling.

Read about where your money goes here : http://earthjustice.org/your-donation-at-work

National Resources Defense Council (NRDC)

The Earth's Best Defense : NRDC

The NRDC was founded in 1970 by a group of law students and attorneys at the forefront of the environmental movement. Their dedicated staff works in more than a dozen program areas such as: the Center for Market Innovation; climate and clean air; land and wildlife; oceans; environmental justice; food and agriculture; health and environment; water; urban solutions; and energy and transportation. Like Earthjustice, the NDRC is fully transparent with their finances and gets the highest accolades from charity rating organizations such as Charity Navigator and the Better Business Bureau. The NDRC experts utilize data and science to unearth the root causes of problems that confront us all. They then use this information to create transformative solutions and policies.

Read about this organization, in-depth here : https://www.nrdc.org/work

Earth day initiative. Earth Day donation by Simply Wood Rings. Jewelry business donation, Chicago.

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October Birthwood Story

Marigold Flower


     Hello! Since my Birthday was Monday and my birthwood ring is the October ring, I wanted to share my personal birthwood story with all of you! Also check out our new October Birthwood Video at the end! 

For the first 19 years of my life, I celebrated my birthday with my grandmother. This is because we happened to have the same birthday. October 17th was always the one day out of the year that I looked forward to the most. My grandma and I would hang out together and she would usually make us a birthday dinner of meatloaf, mashed potatoes, and cherry pie. I hung out with my grandmother most days because she was my primary caretaker as a child, so our birthday really wasn't that much different than any other day, but it always felt different to me. I never had a birthday that was my "own", but in all honesty the thought always scared me. I knew that when I lost my grandmother and my best friend, I would have my first birthday that was my "own".

My grandmother passed a few days before our shared birthday six years ago. I was turning 20 and she would have been 84.

My birthday is now bittersweet most years because it is a time of remembrance as well as celebration. I try to think of it as a celebration of her life and how it affected mine and celebrate how she still lives through me. Dates and months can hold a lot of memories for people throughout time, and October will always be a special month for me. This is why the October birthwood ring is so important to me. The wood for the October birthwood ring is maple, which stands for offering, generosity, balance, promise and practicality. The marigold inlay symbolizes grace, protection, comfort, and healing.

If my grandmother was anything in life, she was generous. She babysat me for my entire childhood while expecting nothing in return. She would bake breads, muffins, brownies, and any other baked good you could think of and then give it all to her neighbors. She also offered me much protection and comfort while helping me through all troubling situations that life threw at me as a child and teenager. The marigold in this ring also offers me a sort of comfort when I look at it and remember my grandmother through the ring. I will always hold her close to my heart in everything I do, which is why having a ring that symbolizes our life together is so important to me.

Written by Christina D.

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What is a Moissanite?

While browsing our site, you may have noticed that we use what is called a moissanite in almost all of our rings with stones in them. I have realized that most people don't know what exactly a moissanite is, and have never even heard of it before viewing our rings! Well, I am here to let you know just exactly what a moissanite is!

Moissanites are stones that are an eco-friendly alternative to diamonds. Most people want diamonds in their rings because of the sparkle and hardness of them, which is totally understandable! The only thing is that diamonds are not always eco-friendly and most of the time their origins are unknown. This is why a scientist named Henri Moissan created an alternative to diamonds. He discovered moissanite crystals in a crater that was created by a meteorite in 1893. He realized these crystals had more brilliance than a diamond and he found out they were composed of silicon carbonate.  Since the crystals are extremely hard to find in nature being that they come from a meteorite, he decided to start growing them in science labs. Henri Moissan later won the nobel prize for his discoveries. 

The moissanites that we get to use in our wooden rings come from a company called Charles and Colvard. They are one of the top leading moissanite distributors in the world. Moissanites have been proven to have a hardness of 9.25 on the Mohs scale of hardness, which makes it one of the hardest substances on earth!  This means that it can resist all surface scratching as well as having an incredible brilliance to it. 

Since we are an eco-friendly business and are incredibly conscious of where all our materials come from, we really couldn't find anything better than moissanites to use in our rings. We hope you love them just as much as we do!! 

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Wood Ring Tales – Adam and Vicki

We haven't posted a Wood Ring Tales in a while for you, so here is our newest story! Adam and Vicki are two of our customers who made some very personalized rings for themselves. We are always happy to create custom orders, especially creating rings that can be paired with engagement rings like Vicki's.  Here is an excerpt from the ceremony that the couple shared with us:

The ring is a symbol of the unbroken circle of love, of family and commitment. These rings are made of Black Walnut, taken from a tree planted by Vicki's grandparents, Tom and Ann Niblock. Black Walnut has also played a significant role in Adams life; it was our grandfather's favorite nut, and several black walnut trees dotted the family homestead. Inlaid in Vicki’s ring are stones that they collected from the beach in Delaware, where they first pledged their commitment to each other through engagement.

Adam and Vicki, your choice of this wood for your rings is fitting. Your marriage, like a tree, is a living, breathing thing. It must be carefully nurtured, to allow its roots to spread and deepen. Over time, it will change, never the same from year to year, but ever growing and increasing in strength. It will witnesses the passing of the seasons, and through every winter, it will keep faith in the hope of spring. It will weather storms and rejoice in the warmth of the sun. May these rings always remind you of the vows you have taken.

We love their story and we are so happy that we were able to create something so special for them! Congrats Adam and Vicki! Below are some pictures from the ceremony. 

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The Importance of Ephemeral Jewelry

Jewelry has been around from the beginning of time. Some of the first recorded jewelry was made by neanderthals using bones they found. The earliest finding of jewelry was dated around 25,000 years ago. This simple necklace made of fish bones was found in a cave in Monaco.

Of course, jewelry made thousands of years ago isn’t like the jewelry we wear today. When researching ancient jewelry and techniques that civilizations used, one thing I found to be interesting was the ephemeral nature of most of the jewelry. A lot of the time at the office we speak about our jewelry as being ephemeral because of the nature of the material we use. This transient nature is one of the main reasons we use wood. Wood is fragile, it connects us to the earth, it doesn’t last forever, and keeps us in the present moment. I saw that in some of the materials that were used in ancient jewelry, like shells, feathers, hair, rope, wood, and bone. All of these materials are episodic, impermanent, and temporary, and in this we find beauty.

Jewelry has been around from the beginning of time. Some of the first recorded jewelry was made by neanderthals using bones they found. The earliest finding of jewelry was dated around 25,000 years ago. This simple necklace made of fish bones was found in a cave in Monaco. Of course, jewelry made thousands of years ago isn’t like the jewelry we wear today. When researching ancient jewelry and techniques that civilizations used, one thing I found to be interesting was the ephemeral nature of most of the jewelry. A lot of the time at the office we speak about our jewelry as being ephemeral because of the nature of the material we use. This transient nature is one of the main reasons we use wood. Wood is fragile, it connects us

Feather and Shell Necklace from New Guinea  photo courtesy of pinterest


In New Guinea, people started making jewelry with the objects they found around them, like bones, tusks, teeth, and gemstones. Some of the jewelry that they created was highly valued because of how impermanent it was. They would create pieces from flowers, rare shells, and precious stones. These pieces connected them to the land they were from, and gave them a sense of identity and place in the world. The pieces were not about durability, but about importance in the moment. In Africa, a lot of tribes used wood to carve into beads and paint and then string together for necklaces. The wood was a material they had readily available, but at the same time served as a connection for them to the land they appreciated and represented.

african jewelry, jewelry, wooden jewelry, wood, tribal, painted wood, beads, necklaces, ephemeral

African Wood Necklaces  photo courtesy of interestingafricafacts.com

Jewelry later came to denote human connection and commitment to one another. Slaves were made to wear bracelets to show who they belonged to. Wedding rings symbolized the commitment two people had for each other. Some jewelry of the ephemeral nature that represents this concept is Victorian hair jewelry. People would take the hair from deceased loved ones and weave it into necklaces and other pieces of jewelry.

                                Victorian Hair Jewelry  Photo Courtesy of Gordon McDowell

These are all examples of jewelry that weren't intended to last forever, like a diamond or precious metal, but were made to have a specific significance in place and time that was important to the person wearing the piece. Jewelry is special in that it connects us to the people around us and the place where the materials are from. We take pride in these values since we use all locally salvaged wood and the stories of our customers.

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Mother’s Wood Rings

Mother's Day is fast approaching, and we have the perfect ring for a Mother or Mother-to-be. We have taken the concept from Birthwood and came up with the design for a ring that is centered around a mother and her child or multiple children. 

The Mother's Ring is the idea that you would take a mother's birthwood and use it as the base wood for a ring, then inlay the birthstones of however many children she has in the center. You can use this idea for a grandmother, mother, sister, wife, or any woman in your life who has children. This is also a perfect ring for men as Father's Day approaches!

Mother's Ring using Birthwood Willow and inlays of Opal and Black Pearl 

Another way you can make a ring for your mother, grandmother, or wife is by using the concept from our Sitting in a Tree Ring. This ring uses the birthwood that represents the anniversary of the couple as the base wood, then has inlays of the birthwoods that represent the parents sandwiching inlays of the children's birthstones in the center. 

Sitting in a Tree Ring with Cherry as the base wood, with inlays of Walnut, Imperial Topaz, Amethyst, and Pine.

​Both ideas make for a very unique present to give the woman in your life! If you order your Mother's Ring between now and May 8th, you will receive a free container of ring balm and an extra special surprise. If you do want to receive the ring by Mother's Day, make sure to get your order in by March 31st!


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Wood Ring Tales – Stephanie and Don

In today's edition of Wood Ring Tales, we have featured Stephanie and Don! This couple had a really incredible wedding in the San Juan Islands. They ordered a pair of our Seashore's Muse wedding rings, which you can see in the pictures below. Stephanie is a fellow blogger and she wrote a little piece about their rings and wedding at www.Earthboxinn.com. Here is a snippet of her post below! 

“I’m Steffi. I have been with the Earthbox Inn & Spa for 10 years. I write this blog, respond to you on Trip Advisor, manage group bookings, among other things. A couple of years ago I fell in love. Hard. With a single Dad from Kirkland. For the first year of us dating, we saw each other only every other weekend. Until I moved to Kirkland last year, we had never seen each other on a Wednesday.

Late last year, when visiting our friend Laura, the owner of the Earthbox Inn & Spa, sipping coffee on her patio, watching whales swim by, we decided to get married. On South Beach, on the first full moon of the New Year.

We wanted unique rings with meaning to us and decided on Rosewood rings with a Mother of Pearl inlay. The wild rose is our flower and everything we do is by the sea. Simply Wood Rings, a small company in Chicago, made them and kindly held our hands through the process as we worried that they wouldn’t be ready in time.

Don and the kids went to Southbeach several hours before the wedding to build a bonfire. It was raining hard. When I arrived the rain stopped and our small group of guests was gathered around a raging fire, sipping hot coco and coffee. My stepdaughter led us down a path to the beach, to a driftwood arch, decorated with balloons, seashells and bones, courtesy of Don & the kids. A couple of sea lions swam by, checking us out. It was absolutely still but the sound of little low tide waves lapping onshore. Therese did her magic and lot’s of laughter and some tears later we were husband and wife. We returned to the fire for champagne and toasts and stayed until the sun set dramatically and gorgeously after the rain.”

Stephanie and Don also provided us with some awesome photos from the ceremony, which was photographed by Jon Sinclair. 

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Nuts About Walnuts

What do all of the following things have in common?
Whole Walnut Kernel

via Wikipedia

walnut tree
via Garden of Eden

Nuts About Walnuts walnut inlay ring

They’re all made of walnut!

We love the Nuts About You ring for its monomaterial elegance: the wood is walnut, the inlay is crushed walnut.

Walnut is — as we 21st century eaters know — FULL of Omega-3s and healthy fats, protein and a great woody umami taste. It’s also known for focus, energy, and strength. Its scientific name — juglans — translates to “tree of Jupiter,” the Roman god of the sky, (Zeus, for you Greek myth nerdlets out there). It’s a plant which unites pragmatic functionality and heroic strength.

Convinced as we are? Head on over to the shop to get one on your functional, strong little finger.

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The 1st Chicago Not Wedding Engagement Ring!

We’re so excited to be a part of the 1st Chicago NotWedding, “a bridal show in the form of a big fake wedding” for couples planning to say “I Do!” The fab to-do is next Thursday, but the amazing Megan Saul did a Save The Date shoot with Ashley and Brian, the NotWedding already-married couple. (All the photos below are Megan’s, save the ring and studio shots.)The Bread and Butterfly made Ashley’s beautiful floral headpiece, and Chykalophia the sweet printed cards below.

And us? We made Ashley’s engagement ring!

Chicago Not Wedding Engagement Ring photography session

Chicago Not Wedding Engagement Ring photo megan saul photography

Here it is up close! The concept for the wedding is “black tie,” and so we wanted to design a ring that united a crisp, modern, glamorous look with our warm natural aesthetic.

Not Wedding Engagement Ring

For the NotWedding engagement ring, we used salvaged juniper, crushed lava rock, white holly and gold leaf.

american holly in the studio

crushed lava in the studio

gold leaf in the studio

Chicago Not Wedding Engagement Ring

Chicago Not Wedding Engagement Ring

We can’t wait for the event, and to show you the wedding bands to match. For more information, check out the NotWedding site.

Like this ring? Want something like it? Head over to the Custom Rings page!

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Prong Setting Super Post

Prong Setting Super Post

In 1872 Ferdinand J. Herpers patented the prong setting for the Tiffany Company, who had introduced it as the “Tiffany Setting” in 1886.

It is an embrace of a setting, the prongs used in a similar way to how we use the fingers of our hands.

At SWR, we’re always amazed at how different one prong-set ring looks from another. Recently, we’ve moved away from a simple pin-mounted setting. We like to use a prong setting laser-welded to a metal ring inlay. as you’ll see below. We find they’re stronger that way, and quite striking.

garnet set
rosewood, garnet, patina’d gold<

raw diamond
walnut, client-provided raw diamond

topaz setting

Moissianite Engagement ring
dark bogwood, moissanite, mother of pearl inlay

Engagement Set Inlay
rosewood, topaz, opal inlay

Contrasting Set Rings
rosewood and steel, moissanite

Interested in your own prong set wood ring? Get started by filling out our Custom Ring form!

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A Sweet Hero of a Ring

A Sweet Hero of a Ring

There’s something about this ring that reminds us of the magical, the mythical, the fairy tale, the legendary. It’s a ring that unlocks, that graces a hero, that signifies unseen strength and depth.

It reminds us of the feeling you get in your chest, the embrace and tension, right before doing good: committing acts of kindness, making other peoples’ lives better in some small or large way. It’s the enjoyment of humanity and the collective.

Yowza!

Yes, we admit it. We are total and utter Romantic ring nerds. And we’re proud.

Want to be a ring nerd? Discover your magic in the shop!

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On Glitter, and Value

No one ever wants glitter.

We wish someone would!

Or perhaps ground pyrite (fool’s gold), shimmering under the finish as it would in the fast currents of the creek.

Pyrite elbe

Fool’s gold itself (image by Didier Descouens, via Wikipedia

At the studio, one of us remembers discovering a chunk of pyrite during a creek walk at Pilgrim Hills. She was five at the time, and only beginning to understand the idea of currency. Fishing it up from the sandy bottom, she hollered: “We’re rich!” Like Scrooge McDuck or Donald Trump. Her mother giggled a bit, had to explain as they walked home that though the rock was beautiful, it wasn’t gold. Their bank balance would remain the same. They would have to skip a lazy backstroke through a room-sized vault of doubloons. They watched a whitetail deer mince along the treeline. “But it’s still really beautiful,” her mother said. “You should keep it on your windowsill where it’ll reflect the light.”

At Simply Wood Rings, we work with this kind of beauty: the natural, the authentic. Sure: money helps us all live in our contemporary lives, but natural beauty feeds a different part. This is why we love doing what we do. We’re not only spellbound but inspired by our materials, their past lives, their journeys. They reflect our own evolutions as people on a planet full of uncountable types and forms of beauties.

Seashore's Muse: Rosewood and Mother of Pearl

Seashore’s Muse: Rosewood and Mother of Pearl

Consider: that we want our rings to call attention to this kind of natural wealth.
Consider: that for us, they do.

Be it glitter or pyrite or fossil or ancient woods.
Wishing you some beauty today, wherever you may find it.