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Strength Of Souls

We are pleased to introduce a new set of rings to all of you: our Strength of Souls set!  This ring set pairs oak bands with an inlay of malachite and turquoise to create a very significant ring for the wearer. We really love making these rings, and I will explain why below!!

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The Strength of Souls set represents strength.. For a couple it shows how two people who support and love one another can weather any storm, and these rings represent that journey. If you only wear one for yourself, it shows that you are a strong grounded person who knows what they stand for. The Oak tree has a long history of representing strength, as well as malachite and turquoise. 

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Oak

Oak is a wood native to the northern hemisphere and it represents strength and a noble spirit. The Ancient Celts observed the oak tree’s massive growth and impressive expanse and they realized that this tree can endure most things. They also observed that oak trees attract lightening and they thought this made them even more powerful. Oak trees are known to live for over 200 years which shows how strong and stable they are during all the things they endure. Ancient people also made doors from oak because of the tree’s strength. They believed these doors would keep out evil spirits. This tree is known to represent truth and knowledge.

Turquoise

Turquoise was found in many burial sites of warriors throughout both north and south america because of the strength of the stone. in the Orient, rings and amulets were used to protect against evil spirits. Turkish soldiers would wear turquoise to prevent falls while riding their horses in battle. The apaches believed there would be turquoise at the end of a rainbow for good luck.

Malachite 

Inherent in Malachite is lighter green eye-shaped forms or bands on its surface. These "eye stones," believed to enhance great visionary powers, were used to ward off negative happenings. They were stones of security and protection for children, and their most remarkable association today is the ability to warn of impending danger by breaking into pieces. It is a Stone of Transformation, assisting one in changing situations and providing for spiritual growth. Malachite is a protection stone, absorbing negative energies and pollutants from the atmosphere and from the body. As a stone of transformation, Malachite encourages change and emotional risk-taking.

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360 Degrees of Awesome

Often we only show you one view of a ring (so many rings, so little time!) but we thought we’d splash into the Photoshop pool to show you the many pretty and different views of the “x” inlay. Such movement!

Oak Lapis Cross Inlay 4 Way View
oak lapis

Want to know more about how our rings are durable and different? Check out our “About Rings” page.

top: oak ring trio l: lapis lazuli “x” inlay,
center: mother of pearl,
right:lapis lazuli
bottom: a 360-degree view of the “x” inlay

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The Sea in a Ring: So Beautiful it’s embarrassing

The Sea in a Ring
Bogwood, Turquoise, Malachite, Mother of Pearl

This ring puts us in the mind of the summer sea at night, maybe some moonlight passed along the water, and the song “Sea of Love,” by Phil Phillips. Particularly the cover by Cat Power.

Come with me, my love
To the sea, the sea of love
I want to tell you how much I love you

The ocean can feel endless, a circle is endless, life is finite but can be so lovely.

We’re getting a little too philosophical, maybe. It can be a problem around here. We’re aware. We’re working on it. But! Those aren’t tears. That’s just the shore wind kicking up sand.

Okay, we’re fine now. Promise. Just go watch this ridiculous video (for a very different sea/love song) while we put ourselves together.

Then head to the Ring Shop for your own embarrassingly beautiful adornment.

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Urbs in Horto: City of Chicago Flag Ring

“Urbs In Hoto” is the Chicago city motto. It means “City in a Garden,” and anyone who’s spent any time in our hometown knows why. The land is full of parks and trees and nature in every available corner.

This afternoon, at the direction of a client, we took the motto literally, and made the city flag out of fauna. It’s freshly made by our expert artisans (with a special shout-out to Joe, for the #flawless inlay), out of oak with red and blue fluorite.

City of Chicago Flag Ring by Simply Wood Rings: oak with red and blue fluorite.

City of Chicago Flag Ring by Simply Wood Rings: oak with red and blue fluorite.

We’re all crushing on it, and Gustav already has a plan to make a version of it with lighter, locally foraged maple.

In case you (like some of us transplants) didn’t know, the four stars of the Chicago flag represent Fort Dearborn (first built on the banks of the river in what’s now the Loop); the Great Chicago Fire (certainly a transformative moment); and the World’s Columbian Express, and the Century of Progress Exposition rounding up the count.

Interested in your own Chicago or [TO WHATEVER YOU PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE] ring? Sidle on up to our pretty new site, and contact us with ideas, dreams, challenges, and questions!

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A Romantic Post About Bogwood

When we think of our bogwood rings, they bring to mind mizzle (mist + drizzle, a real and wonderful word) and mystery: a tree fallen into a peat bog and grown-over centuries ago, not petrified nor decayed, a sort of immortal thing, just beginning to be a fossil.

Young At Heart

Our “Young at Heart – Yang” ring.

As one of us said today: it’s easy to write a romantic blog post about bogwood, because bogwood is so romantic!

Indeed, what more do we want of our love than to hold it close, and feel it everlasting? Often in Ireland, bogwood logs — once of oak or pine, yew or cypress — are dredged from their wet climes and placed into piled cairns, meant to mark a trail. Or else a canny harvester looks for the last-left frost across the peat: wherever there is still frost, bogwood can be found below. Being such “new” people in the presence of such an old material makes us feel quite pleasantly agog. To wear such a ring unites us with the earth and everything. The bogwood rings, too, make us misty eyed, and remember the specialness of life, where we are coming from and where we are going, as Italo Calvino writes in Invisible Cities: “The city…does not tell its past, but contains it like the lines of a hand, written in the corners of the streets, the gratings of the windows, the banisters of the steps, the antennae of the lightning rods, the poles of the flags, every segment marked in turn with scratches, indentations, scrolls.”